New publication: Ecocriticism and Jim Crace’s Early Novels

At the end of October, Jim Crace: Into the Wilderness, edited by Katy Shaw and Kate Aughterson, was published by Palgrave. It’s the first book focusing solely on Jim Crace’s novels, placing them in a broader context of philosophical, political and cultural debates. It includes essays on pastoral, gender and religion, and  focuses on Crace’sContinue reading “New publication: Ecocriticism and Jim Crace’s Early Novels”

Starting a new project: Future Floods, Flooded Futures

My new project is on what I call “flood fictions”, novels that use floods as a literal consequence of climate crisis, but also as a symbolic image for life in the Anthropocene: unpredictable, overwhelming and quite literally engulfing. Floods become synecdoches for climate crisis as a whole, bringing the large scale developments leading to andContinue reading “Starting a new project: Future Floods, Flooded Futures”

Currently: research (Jan & Feb 2018)

January January was a good month, research-wise: I had a lot of things planned, but I was able to do some of that in December, and had a lot of energy to work on the other projects in January.     What I worked on: Submitted an article on Ian McEwan and ecology – IContinue reading “Currently: research (Jan & Feb 2018)”

Announcing Climate Crisis and the 21st-century British Novel

I’m fascinated by how we talk about nature and how we imagine it. Contemporary stories about nature are the topic of my new book, Climate Crisis and the 21st-century British Novel. The way we think about nature goes beyond new nature writing or documentaries of the kind that became popular after Al Gore’s An InconvenientContinue reading “Announcing Climate Crisis and the 21st-century British Novel”

Wild imagination: the appeal of real and imaginary wilderness

This past weekend, Dutch news agencies reported the return of the wolf to the Netherlands, over a hundred years after the last time a wolf was seen in the country. The return of the species was much anticipated and debated by organizations such as Wolven in Nederland (“Wolves in the Netherlands”). The existence of organizationsContinue reading “Wild imagination: the appeal of real and imaginary wilderness”

Macho nature? Or, Gender in New Nature Writing Part I

Sure, the few tentative attempts at defining a new British nature writing suggest that this is a (sub) genre dominated by men, with the notable exception of Kathleen Jamie. Nonetheless, I’d never really thought of these new British nature writing texts in terms of gender – perhaps the result of years of reading of ecocriticalContinue reading “Macho nature? Or, Gender in New Nature Writing Part I”