New article: Flooded Futures

In this article I set out the genre of “flood fictions”, novels that use floods to depict climate crisis. I explore a few twenty-first-century British novels (Megan Hunter’s The End We Start From, Clare Morrall’s When the Floods Came, and Sarah Hall’s The Carhullan Army) in which floods are literal and figurative consequences of climate crisis.Continue reading “New article: Flooded Futures”

New publication: Ecocriticism and Jim Crace’s Early Novels

At the end of October, Jim Crace: Into the Wilderness, edited by Katy Shaw and Kate Aughterson, was published by Palgrave. It’s the first book focusing solely on Jim Crace’s novels, placing them in a broader context of philosophical, political and cultural debates. It includes essays on pastoral, gender and religion, and  focuses on Crace’sContinue reading “New publication: Ecocriticism and Jim Crace’s Early Novels”

New publication: Graham Swift’s Waterland, Ecocriticism and Narratology

This month my article on Graham Swift’s Waterland appeared in Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment. I’d been working on this article for a while, and benefited from the comments of an excellent peer reviewer, so I’m particularly pleased to see it published. A link to the free version of the article on the OxfordContinue reading “New publication: Graham Swift’s Waterland, Ecocriticism and Narratology”

The End We Start From and the genre of flood fiction

Megan Hunter’s 2017 novel The End We Start From starts with an unnamed narrator giving birth to her child while around her London floods. This novel is one of the flood fictions that I explore as part of my new research project. In June 2018, I gave a paper on The End We Start FromContinue reading “The End We Start From and the genre of flood fiction”

Starting a new project: Future Floods, Flooded Futures

My new project is on what I call “flood fictions”, novels that use floods as a literal consequence of climate crisis, but also as a symbolic image for life in the Anthropocene: unpredictable, overwhelming and quite literally engulfing. Floods become synecdoches for climate crisis as a whole, bringing the large scale developments leading to andContinue reading “Starting a new project: Future Floods, Flooded Futures”

Currently: research (Jan & Feb 2018)

January January was a good month, research-wise: I had a lot of things planned, but I was able to do some of that in December, and had a lot of energy to work on the other projects in January.     What I worked on: Submitted an article on Ian McEwan and ecology – IContinue reading “Currently: research (Jan & Feb 2018)”

Some thoughts on climate crisis in films

I recently saw the 2017 film Geostorm. The premise of the film is that in the near future a solution is devised by scientists to control the freak weather caused by climate change. The solution is a network of satellites colloquially called ‘Dutch boy’, after the story of the Dutch boy who put his fingerContinue reading “Some thoughts on climate crisis in films”

Current research (Nov. 2017)

Currently: writing: article on Ian McEwan, science, ecology & climate crisis; drafting: new project, on British flood narratives (future book project); thinking: abstracts for this conference on Sarah Hall, and this conference on Marine Transgressions; more thinking: fellowship application – this is still very much in the back of my mind. My new book wasContinue reading “Current research (Nov. 2017)”

A Short Intro to Climate Crisis and the 21st-Century British Novel

(This post is a repost of a guest blog post I wrote for Bloomsbury’s Literary Studies blog)  At some point early into my research on climate crisis, I began to get the feeling that climate crisis was everywhere. I saw it referenced in films, novels, in food advertising. This, of course, happens to anyone whoContinue reading “A Short Intro to Climate Crisis and the 21st-Century British Novel”

The cocktail-party explanation of my book

Writing a book about books seems alien to many people outside of academia. Over the past years I’ve tried to explain to family and friends why I was writing a book about 21st-century British novels, and why that’s even interesting. This is the explanation that I came up with. My new book (published November 2nd,Continue reading “The cocktail-party explanation of my book”